Lenin in the Officers‘ House

In contrast to other Soviet Army sites that today are crumbling apart, the Officers‘ House in Brandenburg an der Havel is in a perfect state of preservation. The association „Jugendkulturfabrik“ is based there and uses the facilities for cultural events. The history of the house and especially the Soviet period is not forgotten, but deliberately emphasized, so that Lenin is also still a present figure. Weiterlesen

The engraved portrait of Lenin

When the Soviet Army left East Germany in the early 1990s, a vast network of empty barracks and ghost towns was left behind. There are still traces, leftovers and some mysteries of the Soviets to be found there today. One of these enigmas is the Lenin head, about one meter high, carved into the wall in the abandoned complex in Kummersdorf. Weiterlesen

In the shadow of Perestroika

The hall is dark and has to be lighted with a torch. Now Lenin appears on the back wall in a resolute forward march. Behind him are symbolic buildings and infrastructure of the Soviet Union as well as a waving red flag with a Roman XXVII. Apparently, the mural was created on the occasion of the 27th Party Congress of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union (CPSU), which took place in Moscow from 25th February to 6th March 1986. There, the General Secretary of the Central Committee, Mikhail Gorbachev, introduced the political reforms of glasnost (openness) and perestroika (restructuring) with which he wanted to modernise the Soviet Union. This process failed and only five years after the announcement of the plans, the USSR disintegrated. Weiterlesen

Lenin at the nuclear bunker

The Special Weapons Depot in the wooded area near Stolzenhain was once a strategically important facility of the Group of Soviet Forces in Germany, but after the German reunification the complex was abandoned. The traces left behind give the forest a post-apocalyptic aura today, to which especially the abandoned nuclear bunker contribute. But there are also some Soviet traces left in the barracks area, including a small Lenin mural commemorating the 70th anniversary of the October Revolution. Weiterlesen

Lenin in the Olympic Village

The Olympic Games in Berlin in 1936 were held during the Nazi regime and the National Socialist regime used them to project a positive, modern image of itself. The Olympic Stadium in Berlin-Westend was built for the sporting competitions and 18 kilometres to the west, in the Brandenburg Elstal, the accommodation for the international athletes was erected. 80 years have passed and now part of the rotten complex of the Olympic Village is being redeveloped into luxury flats, while the rest is left to decay. Among the abandoned buildings is the Hindenburghaus, named in honour of the former Field Marshal and President of the Reich, a cultural centre where a Lenin mural can still be found today. And of course, one might ask how this Lenin painting came to be placed in a sports complex built by the Nazis. Weiterlesen

The hidden mural

On the former airfield in Sperenberg (Brandenburg) there is still a flaking Soviet mural with Lenin inside an abandoned building. It is a difficult discovery even for experienced Urbex explorers, because the corridor to the room can only be reached through a small hole in a wall. But first you have to find the right building in this vast ghost town. Weiterlesen

The copy of a relief

 

1_Dallgow

The municipality of Dallgow-Döberitz is located south of Falkensee, only a few kilometres from Berlin. Here is one of the many Soviet war cemeteries in Germany, where 628 soldiers and officers of the Red Army who have fallen in the battle for Berlin and some Soviet army members who died in service after 1945 are buried. The memorial was built shortly after the Second World War and stands under the protection of the German-Russian War Graves Agreement. It was thoroughly renovated in 2014. Weiterlesen

The golden Lenin

With a fresh, golden layer of paint Lenin shines again in its old splendour. This bust certainly deserves it; after all, its history is one of the most spectacular monumental chronicles in Germany. It is a sculpture from the Soviet Union stolen during World War II, which was to be melted down in Küstrin-Kietz and turned into raw material for the arms industry. Out of ideological conviction, however, two workers of the scrapping company hid the bust and thus prevented its destruction.
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Fürstenwalder statue set up again on Leninsquare

After the military withdrawal in 1994, a statue of Lenin was left behind in the military area of the Soviet Army in Fürstenwalde. The sculpture is presumably a creation of the members of the army from the 1970s. After a long period of uncertainty, the monument was brought into the private collection of the association IFA-Freunde Trebus (Fürstenwalde) in 2015, where it is part of a large exhibition of GDR vehicles, everyday objects and monuments. Weiterlesen