Lenin peeling off

Two red stars can still be seen on the rusted gate. It stands wide open and leads nowhere, because the garages and warehouses behind it have been demolished in the meantime. Dismantling and complete renovation in Krampnitz are proceeding rapidly, and all traces of the Soviet Army will probably be erased in the coming months and years. Also the red stars and an already heavily weathered Lenin mural. Weiterlesen

Three Orders of Lenin on the theatre façade

Through the doors, which are wide open, one easily enters the theatre building of the former ammunition depot in Kapen, where Soviet troops were stationed in the post-war period. The auditorium is dark and dusty. Only a few boards are left of the old wooden floor. The stage has completely disappeared. At this sight, it is difficult to imagine the glamorous evening events of past times. The only trace of the Soviets is on the outer façade, where a few small painted emblems still remain. Lenin can also be found there. Weiterlesen

In the shadow of Perestroika

The hall is dark and has to be lighted with a torch. Now Lenin appears on the back wall in a resolute forward march. Behind him are symbolic buildings and infrastructure of the Soviet Union as well as a waving red flag with a Roman XXVII. Apparently, the mural was created on the occasion of the 27th Party Congress of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union (CPSU), which took place in Moscow from 25th February to 6th March 1986. There, the General Secretary of the Central Committee, Mikhail Gorbachev, introduced the political reforms of glasnost (openness) and perestroika (restructuring) with which he wanted to modernise the Soviet Union. This process failed and only five years after the announcement of the plans, the USSR disintegrated. Weiterlesen

Lenin at the nuclear bunker

The Special Weapons Depot in the wooded area near Stolzenhain was once a strategically important facility of the Group of Soviet Forces in Germany, but after the German reunification the complex was abandoned. The traces left behind give the forest a post-apocalyptic aura today, to which especially the abandoned nuclear bunker contribute. But there are also some Soviet traces left in the barracks area, including a small Lenin mural commemorating the 70th anniversary of the October Revolution. Weiterlesen

The weathered mural

What was once a side portrait of Lenin is now little more than a large blurred spot on a white background. Lenin and the entire mural are hardly recognisable 30 years after the Soviet army marched out. The humid sea air accelerates the decay and gradually erases this tribute to the Communist Party of the Soviet Union (CPSU) and the hero of the October Revolution right on the Baltic Sea. Weiterlesen

Lenin in the Olympic Village

The Olympic Games in Berlin in 1936 were held during the Nazi regime and the National Socialist regime used them to project a positive, modern image of itself. The Olympic Stadium in Berlin-Westend was built for the sporting competitions and 18 kilometres to the west, in the Brandenburg Elstal, the accommodation for the international athletes was erected. 80 years have passed and now part of the rotten complex of the Olympic Village is being redeveloped into luxury flats, while the rest is left to decay. Among the abandoned buildings is the Hindenburghaus, named in honour of the former Field Marshal and President of the Reich, a cultural centre where a Lenin mural can still be found today. And of course, one might ask how this Lenin painting came to be placed in a sports complex built by the Nazis. Weiterlesen

Mural renovated and extended in graffiti style

While exploring abandoned objects one constantly comes across graffiti, tags and other works of „street art„. They have become part of the unique landscape of abandoned places. However, they rarely have a concrete connection to the historical sites in which they are located and many visitors tend to perceive them as foreign bodies or disturbing elements. An exception can be seen in Möhlau, where a graffiti artist first renovated a monumental Lenin mural of the Soviet army, only to expand it with a stylized Soviet flag. Weiterlesen

Dresden: Lenin statue given away, mural restored

In 1974 Dresden received the second largest German Lenin statue, a 120-ton monument in red granite showing Lenin marching forward followed by two comrades. After the fall of Communism, the statue was removed from its former location and given to the private collection of an art collector from southern Germany, where it still stands today, dismantled into many pieces. The mural „The Path of the Red Flag“, which was made between 1968 and 1969 and depicts Lenin among other communist thinkers and revolutionaries, had a better luck: The thirty-metre long and ten-metre high work of art was put under protection and recently completely restaured. It is now shining in all its splendour again right in the centre of Dresden. Weiterlesen